Devotions and Book(s)

I am really doing a lot of writing right now. Tragically it’s not here. But this is another way you can help the cause.

One of the things I have completely missed is any kind of theological treatise on suffering that would help the Christian understand how suffering fits into the Christian life. I know there’s a bazillion things out there. What’s the best?

In connection with this, what are the best books/articles any of you have read on depression? What are the worst?

Have any of you run across any devotional booklets that were actually helpful? (I’m thinking about another project here.)

Thanks for any input you can give

8 thoughts on “Devotions and Book(s)”

  1. Theological treatise on suffering? I don’t think this is what you’re looking for, but Gerhardt hymns.

    Devotional booklets that are helpful? Defintely “Day by Day We Magnify Thee”!

  2. Theological treatise on suffering? I don’t think this is what you’re looking for, but Gerhardt hymns.

    Devotional booklets that are helpful? Defintely “Day by Day We Magnify Thee”!

  3. Theological treatise on suffering. How about some of Scaer’s sermons? In In Christ there’s the one on Matthew’s Christmas (pages 22-27) and the one on the Lamentations 3 text (pages 386-389). If I recall correctly, there are other appropriate ones in the book too, but these two stand out in my mind without having to dig through the whole book.

  4. Theological treatise on suffering. How about some of Scaer’s sermons? In In Christ there’s the one on Matthew’s Christmas (pages 22-27) and the one on the Lamentations 3 text (pages 386-389). If I recall correctly, there are other appropriate ones in the book too, but these two stand out in my mind without having to dig through the whole book.

  5. Best Books?

    I’ve found the Lutheran resources pretty slim pickings in this area. The Hammer of God was awfully good for my soul. Towards the end of the book, there is less than half a page (please forgive me since this is a very bad paraphrase), where an older man is facing his death and losing a grip on his mind. When the pastor asks if he is afraid, the man replies that he is not, because if he loses his grip on God – God will not lose his grip on him. I’ve learned to look at God as my Keeper in suffering and realize that he will never lose his grip on me.

    The Evangelical books I read long ago are garbage (eg: Yancey, Graham, etal) and I would never recommend their works to anyone.

    The Reformed confessionals are usually a great place to find well thought-out resources. I know a Lutheran lens would need to be applied, but it may be worth the reading trip.

    I also realize there are strong biases among the Lutherans against the the Reformed, but I’ve found that both groups are similar – there is the good, the bad, and the ugly among both groups. I’ve found the Lutheran usually caricature the Reformed in the worst possible way without any distinctions. I wish the Lutherans could appreciate what is good and right with the best of the Reformed. There are some VERY good reformed folk who are worth looking at and the best one’s have both a theology of God’s sovereignty/control plus a theology-of-the-cross in the midst of suffering – they can be a real blessing.

    Almost anything by D.A. Carson is good – both he and his wife have faced life threatening illnesses and he is a recent source I’ve listened to. His theology of suffering and the cross is threaded through almost everything he thinks and says. He is Baptist Reformed, so if you can disregard that part of his theology, I think you’ll find him a breath of fresh air in some ways. If you google ‘D.A. Carson’ with ‘books’ or ‘mp3’ you will find a lot of info. Most of his mp3 recordings are free.

    Some other names to look at are Michael Horton (he has been shaped by suffering in his later life) – whew, I better stop. If you want more, please email me.

  6. Best Books?

    I’ve found the Lutheran resources pretty slim pickings in this area. The Hammer of God was awfully good for my soul. Towards the end of the book, there is less than half a page (please forgive me since this is a very bad paraphrase), where an older man is facing his death and losing a grip on his mind. When the pastor asks if he is afraid, the man replies that he is not, because if he loses his grip on God – God will not lose his grip on him. I’ve learned to look at God as my Keeper in suffering and realize that he will never lose his grip on me.

    The Evangelical books I read long ago are garbage (eg: Yancey, Graham, etal) and I would never recommend their works to anyone.

    The Reformed confessionals are usually a great place to find well thought-out resources. I know a Lutheran lens would need to be applied, but it may be worth the reading trip.

    I also realize there are strong biases among the Lutherans against the the Reformed, but I’ve found that both groups are similar – there is the good, the bad, and the ugly among both groups. I’ve found the Lutheran usually caricature the Reformed in the worst possible way without any distinctions. I wish the Lutherans could appreciate what is good and right with the best of the Reformed. There are some VERY good reformed folk who are worth looking at and the best one’s have both a theology of God’s sovereignty/control plus a theology-of-the-cross in the midst of suffering – they can be a real blessing.

    Almost anything by D.A. Carson is good – both he and his wife have faced life threatening illnesses and he is a recent source I’ve listened to. His theology of suffering and the cross is threaded through almost everything he thinks and says. He is Baptist Reformed, so if you can disregard that part of his theology, I think you’ll find him a breath of fresh air in some ways. If you google ‘D.A. Carson’ with ‘books’ or ‘mp3’ you will find a lot of info. Most of his mp3 recordings are free.

    Some other names to look at are Michael Horton (he has been shaped by suffering in his later life) – whew, I better stop. If you want more, please email me.

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