Watching the Kids

I told my wife a few weeks ago that I thought watching and taking care of children was way harder than being a pastor.  She then told me it was the nicest thing I had ever said to her.

I wasn’t actually trying to get points mit my frau.  I really think that’s true.  Certainly some of the time, maybe even most of the time.

When I was at the height (depth?) of my sickness, it was our children that I couldn’t handle more than anything else.  I’ve blogged a few times about my travails with shut-ins, but really it is children that require a lot more emotional energy, I think.

I bring this up because today I watched our kids.  All of them, for about 4 hours.  I know, that doesn’t sound like much.  Some of them were napping for part of the time, and they were all there and full bore for a little more than an hour.  The thing is, I’m not certain I have watched all of our kids on my own since I came off of disability.  Maybe I have.  But I was glad to be able to do it and not have a complete meltdown in the process.

I love our children.  That isn’t the issue.  The issue is one of responsibility, stimulation, and the ability to process and do on-the-spot problem solving.  None of these things really go well with sufferers of depression.  So I counted today a great victory.  Yes, it was just four hours.  Yes, my saintly wife does it for about 20 hours a day every day.  I don’t know how she does it.  But today, I’ll rejoice in what healing God grants, and prays that it may continue.

Mothers of the world, I salute you.

-DMR

6 thoughts on “Watching the Kids”

  1. When I went through a bad spell mentally earlier this year, it was much harder to be around my children than my husband. My children’s need for me as their mom was almost overwhelming when I was mentally insecure.

  2. When I went through a bad spell mentally earlier this year, it was much harder to be around my children than my husband. My children’s need for me as their mom was almost overwhelming when I was mentally insecure.

  3. I’m happy for you that you achieved this milestone. Those are sweet moments, when you notice that you have accomplished something you couldn’t do before, and you realize that things are indeed getting better.

    I can really identify with how you describe the challenge of caring for children while depressed. I had depression for 1-2 years after my second child was born, and it was rough. Just about any other job would have been easier than being alone for ten hours a day with a baby and a toddler. It helps me to know that I am not the only one who has felt this way, so thank you for sharing as you do with this blog.

  4. I’m happy for you that you achieved this milestone. Those are sweet moments, when you notice that you have accomplished something you couldn’t do before, and you realize that things are indeed getting better.

    I can really identify with how you describe the challenge of caring for children while depressed. I had depression for 1-2 years after my second child was born, and it was rough. Just about any other job would have been easier than being alone for ten hours a day with a baby and a toddler. It helps me to know that I am not the only one who has felt this way, so thank you for sharing as you do with this blog.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Watching the Kids

I told my wife a few weeks ago that I thought watching and taking care of children was way harder than being a pastor.  She then told me it was the nicest thing I had ever said to her.

I wasn’t actually trying to get points mit my frau.  I really think that’s true.  Certainly some of the time, maybe even most of the time.

When I was at the height (depth?) of my sickness, it was our children that I couldn’t handle more than anything else.  I’ve blogged a few times about my travails with shut-ins, but really it is children that require a lot more emotional energy, I think.

I bring this up because today I watched our kids.  All of them, for about 4 hours.  I know, that doesn’t sound like much.  Some of them were napping for part of the time, and they were all there and full bore for a little more than an hour.  The thing is, I’m not certain I have watched all of our kids on my own since I came off of disability.  Maybe I have.  But I was glad to be able to do it and not have a complete meltdown in the process.

I love our children.  That isn’t the issue.  The issue is one of responsibility, stimulation, and the ability to process and do on-the-spot problem solving.  None of these things really go well with sufferers of depression.  So I counted today a great victory.  Yes, it was just four hours.  Yes, my saintly wife does it for about 20 hours a day every day.  I don’t know how she does it.  But today, I’ll rejoice in what healing God grants, and prays that it may continue.

Mothers of the world, I salute you.

-DMR

3 thoughts on “Watching the Kids”

  1. When I went through a bad spell mentally earlier this year, it was much harder to be around my children than my husband. My children’s need for me as their mom was almost overwhelming when I was mentally insecure.

  2. I’m happy for you that you achieved this milestone. Those are sweet moments, when you notice that you have accomplished something you couldn’t do before, and you realize that things are indeed getting better.

    I can really identify with how you describe the challenge of caring for children while depressed. I had depression for 1-2 years after my second child was born, and it was rough. Just about any other job would have been easier than being alone for ten hours a day with a baby and a toddler. It helps me to know that I am not the only one who has felt this way, so thank you for sharing as you do with this blog.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *