Links?

I would like to include some helpful links on various aspects of depression and other mental illnesses, rather than include the “usual suspects” of links that are common in Lutheran cyberspace. Does anyone have any suggestions for sites which would be helpful? They can be theological (specifically dealing with the theology of the cross, imo), medical, or even other Lutherans and/or Lutheran pastors who are exploring these topics in cyberspace. For that matter, I would also consider non-Lutheran links for theological topics, but I would provide some kind of caveat on the process.

Ideas, anyone?

-DarkMyRoad

8 thoughts on “Links?”

  1. How about Gordon over at
    Real Live Preacher.
    Brutally honest about his depression without being maudlin. (I can say that because I, too, walk with the black dog.)
    You may not always agree with his theology, but when it comes to honesty, the man’s as transparent as glass.
    And courageous, well, check it out for yourself.
    LINK: http://www.reallivepreacher.com/node/572

    That people sense this is him, and are drawn to him, is both his strength and sometimes, his greatest burden.

    btw, about being anonymous;
    With the near witch hunt fervor in the confessional Lutheran blogworld, you gotta protect yourself, buddy.

    HEADLINE “Church growth down for Xth straight year. Leaders blame PASTORS dabbling in gospel of psychobabble”

    Don’t laugh, you’ve seen it happen!?!
    I am not ashamed of sharing my experience of mental illness, but when I do, and tack my real name to it, it’s for the benefit of people I know and can trust.
    So unless YOU personallly have discovered the SECRET out of this black hole, no one needs to know the specifics to reap the benefit here.
    You are not diminishing the work you ar doing by protecting your and your family’s privacy.

    My spouse, to give me space and time to heal, wisely discerned those who could truly help by knowing, otherwise lied through the teeth to protect my privacy. I wasn’t always comfortable with that, but sometimes it’s best to let others, in a better frame of mind, make those decisions.
    I am grateful now for that discretion. I have never regretted telling those who would benefit, or benefit my recovery, from the particulars And I don’t regret not telling those who were more akin to spectators on the fringes of my life.
    Besides privacy, it also saved me from widening the circle (and burden) of people, I felt, were “counting on me”. A big factor in developing the depression in the first place.
    (feel free to edit/ cut this down to size.)

  2. How about Gordon over at
    Real Live Preacher.
    Brutally honest about his depression without being maudlin. (I can say that because I, too, walk with the black dog.)
    You may not always agree with his theology, but when it comes to honesty, the man’s as transparent as glass.
    And courageous, well, check it out for yourself.
    LINK: http://www.reallivepreacher.com/node/572

    That people sense this is him, and are drawn to him, is both his strength and sometimes, his greatest burden.

    btw, about being anonymous;
    With the near witch hunt fervor in the confessional Lutheran blogworld, you gotta protect yourself, buddy.

    HEADLINE “Church growth down for Xth straight year. Leaders blame PASTORS dabbling in gospel of psychobabble”

    Don’t laugh, you’ve seen it happen!?!
    I am not ashamed of sharing my experience of mental illness, but when I do, and tack my real name to it, it’s for the benefit of people I know and can trust.
    So unless YOU personallly have discovered the SECRET out of this black hole, no one needs to know the specifics to reap the benefit here.
    You are not diminishing the work you ar doing by protecting your and your family’s privacy.

    My spouse, to give me space and time to heal, wisely discerned those who could truly help by knowing, otherwise lied through the teeth to protect my privacy. I wasn’t always comfortable with that, but sometimes it’s best to let others, in a better frame of mind, make those decisions.
    I am grateful now for that discretion. I have never regretted telling those who would benefit, or benefit my recovery, from the particulars And I don’t regret not telling those who were more akin to spectators on the fringes of my life.
    Besides privacy, it also saved me from widening the circle (and burden) of people, I felt, were “counting on me”. A big factor in developing the depression in the first place.
    (feel free to edit/ cut this down to size.)

  3. I can not recommend the Internet Monk more highly. Sure, he’s a Baptist, but from his writings, I think you may find that he is a kindred spirit.

  4. I can not recommend the Internet Monk more highly. Sure, he’s a Baptist, but from his writings, I think you may find that he is a kindred spirit.

  5. I’ll have to second the vote for the iMonk. When it comes to theology, he writes about questions in worlds that are alien to me (Baptists and alcohol, that kind of thing). But he’s honest about his struggles.

  6. I’ll have to second the vote for the iMonk. When it comes to theology, he writes about questions in worlds that are alien to me (Baptists and alcohol, that kind of thing). But he’s honest about his struggles.

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